Sustainability Development - Greenhouse Gas Management

Sustainability Development - Greenhouse Gas Management

Climate change and GHG management has become one of the most important issues of sustainable development in recent years. As commonly acknowledged by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and Kyoto Protocol, the fundamental countermeasure of slowing down the global warming is to control global GHG emissions in the atmosphere.

Thus, the government authorities of China and foreign countries, jointly with multinational corporations, have requested large enterprises, supply chains, and even transportation companies to submit quantification and report of GHG emissions, which will be used as the reference for their selection of qualified suppliers.

Considering the "low carbon industry", "low carbon consumption" generally become social consensus, an undeniable fact is: companies will be forced by the huge pressure from consumers, governments and other organizations to move into a low-carbon society. Therefore, it has become an essential knowledge and capability for the future management of a company to identify the opportunities and risks in the GHG market and explore corresponding strategies.

ISO14064-1 Understanding and Implementation

Companies and organizations are increasingly aware of the serious injuries to the Earth caused by GHG emissions, thus are taking positive measures to control the GHG emissions. They mainly begin from quantifying their GHG sources and carbon emissions (carbon footprint), then evaluate the risks, carry out reduction strategies and monitor emission reduction performance.

Organizational carbon footprint is the total amount of CO2 and other greenhouse gases emitted within organization, enterprise, or site. Measuring their organizational carbon footprint aiming to evaluate corporate social responsibility and achieve new leap has become the new direction of many world famous enterprises. The first step for company is assessing current status of their footprint, evaluating the benchmark of their carbon emission and then identifying hot-spot for improvement and making corresponding carbon reduction goals.

ISO14064-2 Essentials Understanding and Implementation

This course provides a background and introduction to greenhouse gas (GHG) projects. Projects that intended to cause emission reductions (e.g. alternative energy systems) and removal enhancements (e.g. forestry projects) are involved. The course reviews the requirements of ISO 14064-2, including principles and requirements for planning a GHG project, identifying and selecting GHG sources, sinks and reservoirs relevant to the project and baseline scenario, monitoring, quantifying, documenting and reporting GHG project performance, verification and validation, and managing data quality. The course also explores the linkages between ISO 14064-2 and other GHG protocols, such as the WRI/WBCSD GHG Protocol for Projects and the Voluntary Carbon Standard. Potential linkages with the Clean Development Mechanism will also be discussed.

PAS 2050 Understanding and Implementation

The term ‘product carbon footprint’ refers to the GHG emissions of a product across its life cycle, from raw materials through production, distribution, consumer use and disposal/recycling.

Measuring the carbon footprint of products across their full life cycle is a powerful way for companies to collect the information they need to: reduce GHG emissions; identify cost savings opportunities; incorporate emissions impact into decision making on suppliers, materials, product design, manufacturing processes, etc.; demonstrate environmental/corporate responsibility leadership; meet customer demands for information on product carbon footprints; differentiate and meet demands from ‘green’ consumers.

Product Carbon Footprint Calculation

The term ‘product carbon footprint’ refers to the GHG emissions of a product across its life cycle, from raw materials through production, distribution, consumer use and disposal/recycling.

Measuring the carbon footprint of products across their full life cycle is a powerful way for companies to collect the information they need to: reduce GHG emissions; identify cost savings opportunities; incorporate emissions impact into decision making on suppliers, materials, product design, manufacturing processes, etc.; demonstrate environmental/corporate responsibility leadership; meet customer demands for information on product carbon footprints; differentiate and meet demands from ‘green’ consumers